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Showing posts with label Search. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Search. Show all posts

2017 - How to Upload Youtube Content Marketing Videos

Transfer the Videos to Your Laptop or Desktop... Preferred Format .mp4



Add #Hashtags and Fill in the Full Video Descriptions...

Agree to the Youtube Policies

Share across all your Social Media Platforms...

More... Live Lab Search Engine Optimization

How To Create a Blog

A Blog is the Best Method to Direct Traffic to Your Website
Your Blog must be Unique

Do Not Blog out of Your Business Scope


How To Create a Blog - Why Create a Blog


Learn the Basics of Web Designing


Understanding Content Management - CMS - Software like Joomla and Wordpress

Articles and Menus and how they relate to your CMS Software





Learn the Basics of Web Designing




Search Engine Optimization and Online Business Footprinting

Put Your Small Business on the first page of Google… So naturally curiosity will kill the cat… as Google to me always seemed to be an awesome cat and mouse tool… Could this really be done...?

Watch the SEO and OBF Video Below




SEO stands for Search Engine Optimization and having a website alone is not sufficient… Online Business Footprinting is the activity businesses share utilizing online Tools - Apps and Software so before you go around paying 5k for a 3 month stint to an ‘expert’ here is how you can tackle the SEO basics for your small enterprise…

Your Business Domain Name
Your Domain name is most things, the be all and end of all of it all.

Avoid long domain names. Simple Domain names that encompass your business framework and the design of your business. You can opt for many different types (.com - .co.za - .biz - .info etc).

Good Hosting Costs Money – Expect to pay between R50 to R150 a month (+-1.2K (R1200.00) a year) for a reliable and good host. Also check the track record of the hosting company. You need a company that has been around as you cannot afford to lose your site(s) in the coming years. For some reason we cannot host with Google in South Africa…
(K=1000-thousand)






Learn the Basics of Web Designing

Primarily:

Menus and Articles and how they relate or function around your programme. Request access to the Back End of your site.




Also of benefit is the critical Meta Data and Keyword inputs.

Meta Data and Keywords
Location of services - for example with Inland Finder the company wanted to tag rural areas so rural people could find and access related services at a fraction of a cost… at the same time provide a platform for small businesses and entrepreneurs to advertise cost efficiently yearly... We had to assume the cheapest mobile device utilized in this limited geographical area would search... 

*Ezakheni Steadville Accommodation*



So we tagged *Rural Areas – Business Categories – Services Offered – Population Dynamics – Maps*


It would be impossible and highly a waste had we sourced domains for farm areas so we sourced the closest sizable towns with .info domains



The result… completely satisfied clients… Inland Finder allowed ordinary individuals and businesses the opportunity to be found online and networked to millions worldwide at any given time.

Dominate HTML Markups

Spread your Pages across all Social Networks (Facebook – Twitter – LinkedIn – Pinterest – Google+ - etc.). You could try setting up a google+ page for your business or understand how to get maximum benefits from your facebook business pages.

HTML Markups are the end part of your address links… Try and keep them consistent as this will help your overall SEO in the future.





“Dominate HTML Markups”



Create a Blog



A Blog is the best method to drive traffic to your business website. The earlier you start the better and always blog relatable content. Do not blog out your business scope. You want to look intelligent and not stupid…

We found Blogger to be useful and simple as the platform is owned by Google... There is also Wordpress which enables more functionality...






Link your blog to your social networking and spread your pages across all social networks. Not all networks will grow at the same rate. Always prioritize growing your smallest network first.




Make use of the provided analytical data tools to assess growth and post reach. Invite friends and people of similar interest which will in turn grow into communities over time.

More SEO Videos - Live Lab SEO - Youtube

Email - createAstartup

How To Get Your Local Business on Google

Google Launches Major Push To Get Local Businesses Online, Improve Data

New site offers tools, content and solicits business owners to update information.

GYBo Google


Google is introducing a program it’s calling Let’s Put Our Cities on the Map. This new portal (Get Your Business Online) is not unlike Facebook’s Blueprint and Learn How sites launched this week. It offers resources to business owners (and potential partners) to help them get online or correct and complete their online presences.


Each user who visits will see a localized version of the site (based on IP detection). In addition to various FAQs, videos and other information, Google invites business owners to search for themselves and then tells them whether their listings are present and complete. If “incomplete” it asks businesses to update their information.


Update business listings Google


For those not online at all, Google is also offering a free domain and hosted website (for one year) through Startlogic.


Consistent with its AdWords reseller strategy Google is also trying to reach out to local chambers of commerce and other organizations locally to assist in the effort of getting business data into Google:


We’re also forming partnerships with local organizations—like chambers and small business development centers—and equipping them with free trainings and customized city materials to run workshops just like the one Marieshia attended in Garland. These local partners know the challenges for local businesses more than anyone—and they recognize the value of getting businesses online.


     on March 25, 2015 at 11:36 am                                          Search Engine Land


Keys to Understanding Search Engine Optimization (SEO)

3 Keys To Understanding Your SEO Needs


Many businesses know they need search engine optimization, but they don't know much more beyond that. Columnist Casie Gillette has tips for determining the specifics.



I-C



If you’re a provider of search engine optimization (SEO) services, you’ve undoubtedly heard the following:


“I know I need SEO, but I don’t know exactly what I need.”


If you aren’t an SEO vendor, you may have found yourself saying just that at one time or another.
Businesses have slowly but surely begun to realize the value of search engine optimization, and consequently, the demand for SEO services has increased. However, it’s important to understand what you hope to gain from an SEO program before you embark on one.


After all, SEO can involve a lot of different things: technical audits, on-page content recommendations, conversion optimization recommendations, blog posts, link building programs, etc. It could also be priced in any number of ways dependent on how many of those things are included and to what extent. You’ll want to make sure that, when scoping out a program or vetting a vendor, you know what it is you should be looking for.


understand-needs-ss-1920


Below, I’ve identified three key factors to consider when evaluating your SEO needs:


1. Business Goals



When thinking about any program, your business goals should always come first. In fact, when businesses come to us asking only about traffic and rankings, we try to push them towards what really matters – their overall goals (and, of course, sales)!
As noted above, an SEO program could involve a number of things. By understanding what your overall business goals are, you can determine which SEO services would best fit your needs. Do you want to increase conversions? Build brand or product awareness? Gain visibility locally? Fix a Google penalty? Each of these will require a different SEO strategy.


2. Existing Performance



Another factor that must be considered is the existing performance of your site. When we are assessing potential clients, we look at their analytics data to provide us traffic numbers and conversion numbers over time. We need to understand what we are up against and/or what we have to work with.


Take, for example, Client A:


Client A came to us a year ago with a site that had been on a downward trend for 12 months. In order to get the site back on track and moving in a positive direction, we knew it would require a lot of work and a lot of time on our part. In turn, we created a pretty hefty proposal that included quite a bit of on-site work and off-site work. Thankfully the client understood their position and was on board.

Take a look at how your site has performed over the past couple years. Look at traffic trends, conversion trends, and any other pieces of data in analytics that will help you understand what your site needs. This will also help you figure out what type of budget you may have to put together. If you’re fighting a negative trend, you are going to need a more in-depth program.


3. Resource Constraints



Know where you need help. One of my biggest frustrations with any client is when they tell us they have plenty of resources, yet when the program starts, there is suddenly no one there to do what we need them to do.


Just be realistic. 


If you know where you are lacking, you can start to figure out how an SEO provider can fill in the gaps. For example, if you know that you need content on the site but you don’t have the internal resources to create it, you probably need to rely on your SEO vendor.


It also works the opposite way. If your SEO vendor is proposing writing content for you but you have five content writers on staff, you might just need some editorial guidance to ensure your content team is targeting the right topics and keywords to help drive traffic and conversions. A full content creation program is not needed.


Final Thoughts



Any business who is thinking of engaging in an SEO program should make sure that they have a good understanding of each of these factors going in. It will make the proposal process easier, it’ll help you find a vendor more quickly, and hopefully, it’ll help you create a successful program that helps you hit your business goals.



Some opinions expressed in this article may be those of a guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.                                 Search Engine Land


on March 17, 2015 at 10:27 am

Google Is Looking To Rank Sites Based On Accuracy Of Information



In the future, Google may value the accuracy of your content more than the quality of your backlinks, according to a paper (PDF) recently published by researchers within the company.



New Scientist reports that Google is working on a system where it can determine the trustworthiness of a page not by who is linking to it, or how many incoming links it has, but by the number of facts it contains.



I-C





A score, called a Knowledge-Based Trust score, would be computed for each page by cross referencing the content with facts stored in Google’s Knowledge Vault. The Knowledge Vault is a database of 2.8 billion facts extracted from the web, and is the primary source of information behind theboxes that appear on the right side of some searches.



The more facts contained on a page, the better it will rank. In instances where few facts are found on a page, Google will check the accuracy of other content contained on the site to determine how well it can be trusted overall.



In early tests, the research team says the Knowledge-Based Trust score has been able to reliably predict the trustworthiness of millions of websites. This sounds impressive on paper, and I’m sure the SEO community would appreciate an alternative to links as a ranking signal, but this concept leaves me with a lot of questions.



For example, not every website exists to report facts, so how will trustworthiness be determined in those cases? Well that’s when the research paper says Knowledge-Based Trust isn’t necessarily a replacement for current ranking signals, but a supplement to them.



I’m also concerned about pages written around new technology and new discoveries, with information that hasn’t yet been entered into Google’s Knowledge Graph. If Google started to rely on Knowledge-Based trust to rank web pages, would it then focus additional effort on revising and updating the Knowledge Graph?



That question, and many others, aren’t answered in the report — but I suspect more information will surface as Google continues its testing.




Matt Southern


Freelance Writer at MattSouthern.com Search Engine Journal






Setup Your Google+ For Business






Since Google quietly did away with Authorship, many people have questioned its worth as a marketing tool. Whilst Google maintain that the program wasn’t providing enough value and that the removal of Authorship didn’t reduce traffic to sites, this has been questioned by some marketers. For example, in a Marketing Profs article, Will Mitchell claims that the Authorship markup improved a search result’s CTR by 150%.

It’s true that G+ isn’t right for every niche as it’s mostly niches such as digital marketing and technology that seem to be active on the site. However, there’s little doubt that G+ improves SEO, as ranking factor studies have shown +1s to have a correlation with better rankings. For this reason alone, it’s a good idea to have a G+ presence, but it’s also a good channel for distributing content, especially if it gets shares and +1s.

With that in mind, today we’ll be looking at how to set up and use Google’s social network for your business.





Set Up Your Business Page

You will of course need a Google account and personal profile (make sure you use your real, full name) to get started and once this is in place you can go ahead and create your business page. This will bear the name of your company and you will need to select the type of page that you’re creating, choosing from: 

Shop front – choose if you have a retail business
Service area – for the service industry including professional/business services such as marketing
Brand – products, bands, charities and so on

Once you’ve done this, search for your business by inputting the postcode into the maps page and choosing ‘none of these’ if your business doesn’t appear in the list. Once you’ve done this you’ll see a box appear where you can enter the name and address details of your business.

Important: this is your Google business page so if you have a website and directory listings then enter the address and phone details in the exact same format as it appears elsewhere on the web to optimise for local SEO.


Once you’ve entered your business address and telephone number, you’ll also have to put in the kind of business that you’re in and then you’re ready to go. Enter your business website too and remember that your listing will have to be verified either by phone or postcard, the latter of which can take a little while to come through. Once it’s been verified though, you can start to add more information.
Filling in About Section

In the about section you’re going to want to enter a brief overview of what you do. Keep this snappy, don’t bore your readers, as they’ll want to be able to see what your business is about at a glance. Keep sentences and paragraphs short and factual, don’t pretty it up with a lot of flowery language but do use keywords that are relevant to your business.



You have space for your tagline which should be a short sentence describing your business or your company strapline. You then have the story space where you can expand on your tagline and give more information. Make sure that in the links section, you link to your website and all of your social profiles.

You’ll also want to choose a high res image for your header and a smaller image (such as your logo) for your profile picture.
Header image: minimum 480 x 270 px to maximum 2120 x 1192 px – Google recommends an image size of 1080 x 608 px.
Profile image: minimum 250 x 250 px – larger images work better.
Getting Followers on G+

G+ is one of the most difficult networks to gain followers on so you should set up a strategy to target followers in your niche and that are active on the site. There are a lot of inactive accounts on G+ (remember when everyone decided it was going to be great and defected from Facebook only to rethink a couple of weeks later?) so look for people who engage regularly.

Just like Twitter, you can follow anyone on G+ and they will be notified and have the option to follow you back. Not everyone does of course so ensure that you pop your G+ business profile on the other social networks and include a link on your website. Don’t just follow people at random, first get yourself together a list of:
Influential people in your niche
Potential customers
Other businesses in your industry

Once you’ve done this, it’s time to get looking for people to follow. You can use the search box at the top of the page to search and the ‘find people’ page. On the latter, you’ll be able to see who has added you as well and note that you can search for interests too in the general search box.
Circles

When you follow others you can organise them into different circles so that you can later send targeted content. You can create whatever circles you like, but it’s sensible to order into sections such as general, influencers, potential customers and so on. Later on when you share your content, you can then send special offers just to potential customers or content to influencers that you think they may share. When you create a new update, it’s not shared automatically with everyone and who it is shared with will appear in green in the sharing box. Make sure here that it’s initially set to public and remember when you change it, it will stay that way until you change it back again. This feature has caused many a person to inadvertently share content with themselves alone for months as it’s been set to private so do make sure you check.
Reviews

Make sure that you have a good look around at other business pages and for those that you’ve ever done business with, leave a review. There’s never any guarantee that you’ll get any reviews back though so don’t be shy and ask. You can send out an email campaign asking for reviews too and ask any existing customers.

G+ Communities

Just like LinkedIn discussion groups, G+ communities give you the opportunity to get involved in discussion in order to get noticed. Just search for topics in your niche and request to join likely looking communities. Make sure that the communities you join enjoy plenty of activity though, it’s no use joining one that only sees weekly, rather than daily, interaction.

You may have to be approved by a moderator or manager for some communities but once you’re a member then you’ll be able to post and comment just like you can on your own profile. Be careful when sharing links, these may hold your updates up as they may be queued so that they can be moderated.

Of course, there’s nothing stopping you from starting your own G+ community if you think that there’s a gap in the market and you have an idea for discussion that you think nobody else is handling. To do this simply click on the ‘Create Community’ button on the communities home page. However, do your research, make sure it’s not already being done and bear in mind that there’s a little work involved in moderation. To begin with, I would recommend becoming a member in an active community for a while before starting your own though.
Google Hangouts

Hangouts is one of the most popular G+ features and is used for live video chats with up to ten people. It can be used in a business capacity to hold meetings or it can be used as a way to invite people to discuss something that interests them. For example, say you run a copywriting agency and you’ve recently begun selling courses as a part of your business. You can use a Google Hangout to conduct an online seminar with up to 9 students, giving feedback and allowing them to critique each other’s work as a way to further augment the course.

You can also use Hangouts on Air to stream live video to YouTube and this can be used in a similar way to a webinar, as an informational and/or educational video to further engage your followers.
Advanced G+

So now we’ve looked at the basics, let’s have a look at some more advanced ways of using the search giant’s social network. Firstly, it’s worth noting that if you’re more of a keyboard user and you like to use shortcuts, there are plenty available on G+. To access them, simply go the G+ and press the shift and question mark keys on your keyboard.




As you can see this brings up a list of all of the available shortcuts, you can print these off to keep next to your keyboard for a handy reference.

Tagging other users

To tag another user in a post or comment type a + sign before you begin typing their name and a dropdown box of users will appear. Simply choose the person you’d like to tag from the list and they will be notified that they’ve been mentioned. You can do this to alert people who you think will enjoy relevant content or to share tips and special offers – be imaginative!
Check out Ripples

You can check how widely a post is being shared by using the Ripple feature. To do this hover on any post and in the top right hand corner of the box you will see an arrow appear. Click on this and a dropdown box will appear and at the bottom you’ll see there’s an option to view Ripples.





(Image: Think Traffic)

This one is of course a post that has done very well and it’s unlikely that yours will appear the same unless a post happens to go viral. Generally a post will show a few circles that have shared and some further information at the bottom. Once you really get going on G+ and start to build your audience and reputation, then you’ll begin to see more ripples as your shares increase.

Note that to show up in Ripples a post must have been shared publically, posts that you share with specific circles or privately won’t show up.

You can also check out external posts and links that you haven’t shared yourself on G+ by typinghttp://plus.google.com/ripple/details?url= into the address bar and adding the link you want to check to the end. This will then bring up a page like the one above where you can see Ripples as well as the top influencers sharing the post, how many times it’s being shared per hour, the average chain length and the languages of the people sharing it. This makes your strategy going forward a little easier as you can see the kind of content that your followers like to share the most and adjust accordingly.




If you’re a Chrome user, you can add a bookmark to create a Ripples button to use to check how widely shared posts are as you’re surfing. Simply right-click on the bookmarks bar and select Add Pageand change the name of the new page to Ripples.

Then add the following code into the URL box:javascript:location.href=’https://plus.google.com/u/0/ripple/details?url=’+encodeURIComponent(location.href)

Now you’ll have a Ripples button on your address bar that you can simply click when you hit a post that is in your niche and you feel your audience will like. This is great for research and post planning and it can also help you to identify influencers as you’ll be able to click on the circles to see information on who’s sharing.

Get Googling

Google Plus has lots to offer the marketer and it’s used more widely than many people seem to think. Businesses that are not familiar with social media marketing tend to assume that networks are used for business in a similar way that they are for personal use. This isn’t the case, especially for G+; whilst Facebook remains the world’s most used social network for personal users, businesses are becoming increasingly disillusioned with it and it is difficult to achieve reach. G+ has an active business community though and shouldn’t be dismissed. Images and infographics do especially well on G+ and it’s worth remembering that the site also automatically creates GIFS that you can use too (search for motion in the photos section to find them) as well as automatic image enhancement.

Finally, it’s worth mentioning that unless you spend time on G+ interating with others, commenting and sharing, then it’s unlikely you’ll be successful. Social media does depend rather heavily on you being social, so ensure that you get yourself out there and get noticed!





                                     XEN Systems - Australia

@kesbutters     Bio  Twitter  Google+  Latest Posts       SEO For LinkedIn http://t.co/3TeAuoAJYx #LinkedIn 

Your Business - Local Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Tips

When you're doing Local SEO, columnist Greg Gifford reminds us, you must take a step back and look at the big picture if you want to be successful.

You can't do Local SEO with a microscope
Local SEO is getting more and more complicated, and as we roll into the new year, I want to share my biggest, most important tip:


STOP Using Your Microscope In Local Search!



What do I mean by that? Put simply: A microscope is a great research tool, but it’s a flat-out awful marketing tool.
It seems like we’re hearing more and more of the same kind of question over the past few months: “I’ve done X on my site, why isn’t it working?” or “I read your post about Y, does it make sense for me to drop everything and go do it?”
Local SEO is not, nor has it ever been, based upon a single tactic. Recently, it seems like many business owners will read a post or watch a video, realize that they’re not utilizing the tactic mentioned, and immediately drop everything and concentrate on the shiny new object.
Local SEO is not just citations. Local SEO is not just Google My Business (aka Places) optimization. Local SEO is not just inserting your city and state in title tags and H1 headings.
When you use your microscope to focus on a single tactic, your field of view is so zoomed in that you’re blinded to the other factors that are just as important. It’s a new year, so try a new process — toss that microscope in the trash, take a step back, and look at the big picture.







Recent Updates Shed Light On The Big Picture



You’ve got to spread out all the pieces and figure out how they fit together if you want to assemble the puzzle. Let’s take a look at some important recent updates in the Local Search arena that will help you get a better view of the big picture in 2015:
• Moz’s Local Search Ranking Factors study is a great place to start. David Mihm’s study shows a simple pie chart that arranges the signal groups by weight in the algorithm. Check out the factors and compare them to your current efforts. If your workflow and task list aren’t a fairly close match to the weighted areas of the pie chart, you might want to shift your priorities a bit.
• The most important Google update this year for local businesses was Pigeon. Google drastically changed the way that local results are calculated, and business owners and Local SEOs all across the country collectively freaked out.• Last week, Pigeon rolled out in Canada, Australia, and the UK, and the collective freak-out went international. If you’re still holding out hope that Pigeon was just a temporary test, you need to let it go. SEOs in all three countries are reporting the same results that we’ve been seeing for the last 5 months. Pigeon is here to stay.
• Google threw us for another loop a few weeks ago when it dropped the Local Carousel for many types of businesses. Instead of the Carousel, Google is now displaying an expanded 3-pack.
• The new expanded 3-pack still shows a thumbnail photo like the Carousel, but the listing only shows the business name, review stars, and a short description. Like the Carousel, if you click on one of the listings, you’re taken to another SERP for that specific business… instead of the business’ website or Google My Business page.
• Another critical recent update: Google’s updated Google My Business guidelines. Google is cracking down on category selections, removing the option to add a descriptor to business names, and finally flat-out disallowing virtual offices.

So What Does It All Mean? What’s The Big Picture?



Google is putting significant effort into local search. Whether we like Pigeon or not, it’s a part of the game now, and we all have to adapt.
A few years ago, you could rock some citations and do nothing else, and you’d still rank at the top of the map pack. Now, there might not even be a map pack for your vertical.
With Pigeon and the new expanded 3-pack, it’s clear that mobile behavior is having a huge impact on how Google is approaching local search.
As the scales tip and users switch to mobile devices, local results will be increasingly unique because Google knows exactly where each user is located. You’ve got to have the right (current) relevancy signals both on your site and off your site if you want to compete in 2015.






You’ve got to stop focusing on one or two tactics and instead work on everything.
  • Make your content amazing and informative, but optimize it with local signals
  • If you’ve got location pages, make sure they’re unique and well-written
  • Create local content for your blog
  • Optimize the heck out of your Google My Business listing
  • Get some good links to your site
  • Clean up your citations and go grab any that you’re lacking
  • Get more positive reviews on your GMB listing, and on other third party sites
  • Use social media to interact with your customers
In a nutshell, you should click the “local” button up in the menu and read everything. Twice.
In 2015, you’ve got to be a jack of all trades if you want to succeed in Local SEO. You can’t just bang out a bunch of citations and win any more. You can’t just put your city and state in a few title tags and H1 headings. You can’t just spam a few Google Places categories.
You have to look at the big picture and do it all if you want to succeed.



Some opinions expressed in this article may be those of a guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

  About The Author
                                                           Search Engine Land
      
Greg Gifford is the Director of Search and Social at AutoRevo, a software company that provides websites and online marketing to used car dealers all over the country. Check out their awesome blog for Greg’s local search posts and videos.














Animation - Difference Between Responsve and Adaptive Webdesign

Responsive designs fluidly expand, where as adaptive designs hitch as you expand a browser or viewport.











Positioning your designs elements using pixels as X,Y coordinates can cause a site designed for one screen to look weird on another. Use relative units, like percent of the screen, instead of static units like pixels.





Positioning your designs elements using pixels as X,Y coordinates can cause a site designed for one screen to look weird on another. Use relative units, like percent of the screen, instead of static units like pixels.





Breakpoints allow the layout to change at predefined points, i.e. having three columns on a desktop, but only one column on a mobile device."





As screen sizes become smaller, content starts to take up more vertical space and anything below will be pushed down, it's called the flow."





Having a lot of elements depending on each other would be difficult to control, therefore wrapping elements in a container keeps it way more understandable, clean and tidy. This is where static units like pixels can help."





"Want to have a cool looking Futura or Didot on your website? Use webfonts! Although they will look stunning, remember that each will be downloaded and the more you'll have, the longer it will take to load the page. System fonts on the other hand are lightning fast, except when the user doesn't have it locally, it will fall back to a default font. "







Sometimes it's great that content takes up the whole width of a screen, like on a mobile device, but having the same content stretching to the whole width of your TV screen often makes less sense."





Technically there isn't much of a difference if a project is started from a smaller screen to a bigger (mobile first) or vice versa (desktop first). Yet it adds extra limitations and helps you make decisions if you start with mobile first."





"Does your icon have lot of details and some fancy effects applied? If yes, use a bitmap. If not, consider using a vector image." A vector image can more properly adapt to different resolutions.


Fast Company Design


."



Google Penguin 3.0 Rollout

Google says the Thanksgiving ranking shuffle is related to the Penguin 3.0 release from six weeks ago.


google-penguin2-ss-1920


Google has confirmed with us that the shifts and changes reported throughout the industry on Thanksgiving day were a result of the Penguin 3.0 refresh that first began rolling out 6-weeks ago.
Google told us in response to what we saw on Thanksgiving day, “the Penguin rollout is ongoing, and this is just the effect of that.”


The interesting part was that Google began the rollout of Penguin 3.0 on October 17, 2014, which was 45 days ago, or over six-weeks ago. For this to still be rolling out is unusual, I would think. In addition, many sites that reported changes on that Thanksgiving, only saw recoveries. Meaning, it looked like somewhat of a reversal of the Penguin 3.0 rollout that happened in October. But the results from what happened over Thanksgiving is still unclear.


The Penguin 3.0 rollout initially impacted about 1% of queries, with this Thanksgiving occurrence, I am not sure how much of that has changed.


In any event, those of you impacted by Penguin 3.0, do let us know if you saw positive or negative changes on or after Thanksgiving Day, November 27th.
Here are dates of all Penguin releases:


  • Penguin 1.0 on April 24, 2012 (impacting ~3.1% of queries)
  • Penguin 1.1 on May 26, 2012 (impacting less than 0.1%)
  • Penguin 1.2 on October 5, 2012 (impacting ~0.3% of queries)
  • Penguin 2.0 on May 22, 2013 (impacting 2.3% of queries)
  • Penguin 2.1 on Oct. 4, 2013 (impacting around 1% of queries)
  • Penguin 3.0 on October 17, 2014 (impacting around 1% of queries)
on December 1, 2014 at 11:48 am  Search Engine Land




How to Stay No.1 on Google

Ranking First Is Good, But First With Prerender Is Better...


How do you know when you've got a strong hold on the #1 ranking? Contributor Gene McKenna shows how Google Chrome may provide a clue.



So you thought ranking #1 for a search was as good as you could get, right? How about ranking #1 with a strong indicator that your position there is pretty solid? A new browser optimization in search results might be giving us that clue.


Starting around August 26th, our in-house analytics system at Groupon started reporting a big increase in homepage views.


It’s rare for a search marketing team to complain about too much traffic, but all this new traffic was coming only from the Chrome browser, arriving only at our homepage, and much of it was bouncing, it was killing our revenue-per-session metrics, and all of it was from SEO (Organic Search).
And this “Chrome Home” traffic, as we called it, kept growing and growing — until, by September 25th, we had tens of thousands of additional Chrome requests per day, at a time when other browsers were showing relatively no growth at all. And we saw this in every country around the world that we checked all starting about the same time.


What we learned is that Chrome prerender kicked into high gear for us in September as Google search results pages added prerender tags on searches for Groupon.

Let’s Define Prerender

So, what is prerender, and how does it work? Allow me to illustrate by using an example.
If you search for Groupon, Google knows there is a very high likelihood you will click on the Groupon homepage in the search results. This also applies to lots of other highly predictive searches: [cnn], [nytimes], etc.


In these cases, Chrome will fetch the homepage even before you click on anything in the results. If you do and then click on this prerendered result, Chrome will request the page again — presumably with many static items already cached, providing a faster render time for users.


By now, half of readers will have already gone to check their site metrics to look at their Chrome homepage traffic.


Those that use Google Analytics won’t see anything out of the ordinary. Google Analytics doesn’t record a visit due to prerender, which is generally a good thing because it’s not really a visit. (I don’t have data on other analytics packages, but please leave comments if you’ve seen this in your analytics package.)


Google Head Performance Engineer Steve Souders explains what he calls “prebrowsing” in the October 2013 video below. It is also referred to as prerender. In the video, you’ll learn about various tags that tell a browser to pre-fetch DNS, pre-fetch resources, etc. It’s a great resource for understanding how you can make your website faster.


Souders explains the best time to prefetch things is when there is a strong ability to predict what the user will do next.


Certainly, Google can predict when you might be very likely to click on the first search result. And now, if you go to Google and search [groupon], you will see in the source code of the search results page this prerender tag:


<link href=”http://www.groupon.com/rel=”prerender“>

It doesn’t mean Google does this for the #1 result on every search. Pity the Wham-O corporation which ranks #1 for searches on “frisbee” but does not have the click-through rate necessary to elicit a prerender tag for its homepage on that search – if, indeed, that is how Google is conditioning this.
The Chrome browser has been executing prerender instructions since version 22, and IE since version 11. (There are a number of pre-rendering instructions worth checking out to make your site faster.) But it wasn’t until Google started issuing prerender commands in the search results that we really noticed this in our logs.


When Did This Start?

When this started may vary from search to search. Wham-O may have to wait a long time to get this for frisbee (quick experiment: everyone reading this article, search frisbee and click wham-o and then see if they start getting prerender).


We started seeing it for the search [groupon] in late August and ramping up through about September 25th.


Although we have only seen this in our data from Google SERPs, the video above from Souders states that this could also happen as users start typing into the omnibar (aka address bar) in Chrome if there is a strong prediction about what site you will go to. So, if you go to nytimes.com a lot, by the time you type “ny” in your omnibar, it may already be fetching the New York Times homepage.
And now, SEOs have a new challenge. Ranking #1 is good, but ranking #1 with prerender is even better. Not only will users have a faster experience, but it might be a signal that your hold on the #1 position is strong.


Some opinions expressed in this article may be those of a guest author and not necessarily Search Engine Land. Staff authors are listed here.

on November 12, 2014 at 9:11 am

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